French style: How to make everyday soup

I almost never ate soup growing up in America and when I did, it was almost always Campbell’s. Here in France though, soup is an institution.

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I almost never ate soup growing up in America and when I did, it was almost always Campbell’s. Here in France though, soup is an institution. It’s one of the first things you feed your baby; it’s a common family entrée; and it’s dinner for many older people.

A while back my parents did cook up some French onion soup during a visit here. The recipe was a complex affair: 3 kinds of onions sautéed in butter, Kirsch, white wine, bouillon, eggs, flour, a special kind of cheese. They spent well over an hour, busy as bees, chopping, sautéing, deglazing, dirtying diverse pots and pans.

In the end, their soup was… well, it was pretty damn good. But it was so much work! No wonder they never make soup. And despite all the effort, it wasn’t that much different from my fast-and-easy version (don’t tell them). Continue reading “French style: How to make everyday soup”

Fried gluten balls*

Toss the rice flour, compost the chia seed and donate the paleo cookbook to your local library

Ok, fried gluten balls was supposed to be my bad joke idea for a recipe, but it turns out they really are a thing (and like so many things, only a Google search away). This got me thinking about the cultural significance of food: gluten-free as a dietary choice, yet also reflecting social values and identity.

So let’s have a go at it…

“Fried gluten balls are quite greasy and very delicious.” — Buddah’s Delight.

I’m a native Californian, living in Provence. A poster child of the blithe, unabashed caviar left.  Continue reading “Fried gluten balls*”